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Thursday, April 2, 2015

Video of my new grandchildren

Posted by Dawn-Ann on July 6, 2010

While my blog is mostly about genealogy and Kirkpatrick family research, it seems I’ve been digressing a lot lately. Anyhoo, I just had to share this priceless little video about my grandbabies.

Now, I realize I’m probably just being a typical grandmother and most folks out there are bored with video of babies, but indulge me, please? I proud and I’m happy – that’s reason enough for posting. :)

So now, without further ado, my twin grandbabies (who, by the way, are Kirkpatrick descendants)!

Changes in the Canada census impact genealogical research

Posted by Dawn-Ann on July 1, 2010

Time to start keeping our own records for future generations of family researchers

The genealogical community is abuzz with news that the long form of the Canada census has been tossed. As of next year’s census, 2011, everyone will receive just the short form to fill out. A voluntary “survey” will be sent out to about a third of households.

Folks who are not involved in genealogy are celebrating.  Many found the long form, which only one in five households were asked to fill out in any given year, were onerous and intrusive.  As a matter of fact, one Saskatchewan woman is doing battle in court over her refusal to fill out the long form.

But genealogists are less than pleased. For years, census data has offered important clues in family history research. An Edmonton Journal article says, “A door to Canada’s past has slammed shut, leaving future Canadians with little information about their own families and the country’s history, in a move the government says was prompted by privacy concerns.” This is exactly the kind of discussion I’m hearing in the genealogical circle.

Canadian census records are released to the public after 92 years for privacy reasons. The results of the voluntary “survey” will never be released to the public.

I have found some very valuable family information in census records. They brought my ancestors to life – I could see all the brothers and sisters, their ages, their neighbors, their father’s occupation. It’s sad that future researchers will come up against a brick wall on similar research.

I suppose that’s all the more reason for us to be writing out our own histories and gathering information together for future generations. Thank goodness for those of us who are the family “archivists” and story gatherers!

Maybe you were right all along

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 27, 2010

We all dream big dreams when we’re young, don’t we? Things are black and white and man, we’re going to change the world.

Let your light shine

But life often jades us. We get caught up in the day-to-day and lose our dreams along the way. We start to second-guess ourselves and wonder how we were foolish enough to think we could change anything.

That’s the premise of Pamela Slim’s moving blog entry, Note to younger self: you were right. In it, she reflects upon the big dreams of her college days. Surely, she says, “with compassionate hearts and some really good slide shows, we could fix everything.” After struggling with discouragement, years later Pamela discovers you can change the world – if not in grandiose ways, then one tiny corner at a time.

Her article gives me hope. Read the rest of it here.

Sir Thomas Kirkpatrick’s attire

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 21, 2010

Here’s a really neat historical find I think you’ll like. I stumbled upon it by accident one day and then forgot about it. A place called Artfund has acquired an antique outfit that belonged to our very own Sir Thomas Kirkpatrick. I imagine that’s Sir Thomas who was the Bart of Closeburn. It looks to be in impeccable condition!

Who knew our Sir Thomas was such a fashion plate?

Happy Father’s Day, Dedy!

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 20, 2010

Getting geared up for the Calgary Stampede

I’m really lucky in that I get to see my Dedy fairly regularly, as he lives just a couple hours’ drive away. Occasionally he comes in for family gatherings and appointments and – even more occasionally – I go out to his town for Legion events and just to hang out camping.

This blog post serves no purpose but to let my Dedy know how much I appreciate him and am so glad he is part of my life. I believe we choose before we’re born who we will be spending our lifetimes with and I do believe I chose well.

So, happy Father’s Day, Dedy. I love you! :)

Sandy Kirkpatrick’s pictures, Part III

Posted by Dawn-Ann on

And today I will post the last two pictures Sandy sent me that he took while in Scotland recently. They’re gorgeous images and I just had to share. Thanks again, Sandy!

Sandy says: Closeburn Castle is back in Kirkpatrick hands after 300+ years. Needs some work!

Sandy says this plaque is on the main square of Dumfries, opposite the statue of Robert Burns. Notice that the wording is almost identical to the mural I posted yesterday.

Sandy Kirkpatrick’s pictures, Part II

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 19, 2010

Today I will share a photo Sandy took of a mural he spotted in Dumfries. It depicts the slaying of Red Comyn by Robert the Bruce and acknowledges Sir Roger Kirkpatrick’s part. It also gives the Kirkpatrick motto!

Thank you Sandy for sharing these pictures with us.

Sandy says: This mural is on the wall of a building in central Dumfries.

Scroll detail

Sandy Kirkpatrick’s pictures, Part I

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 18, 2010

Mr. Sandy Kirkpatrick from Florida responded to one of my posts recently. He very kindly offered to share some photos he took while he was in Scotland. He has just returned from there, so his pictures are of sunny spring days – not like my rainy, wet ones from a couple of years ago.

I’ll share one a day for the next few days, sharing my and Sandy’s thoughts. Enjoy!

Today, it’s Caerlaverock Castle. Click on the images to see larger versions.

Sandy says: Most histories (we visited the Dumfries library) say that this impressive castle (built as early as the 1100s and rebuilt many times since) was in Kirkpatrick hands for a brief period in the 1350s, awarded to them for their efforts in taking it back from the English. A Kirkpatrick, maybe Sir Roger's son or grandson, is said in legend to have been murdered there in revenge for the 1306 church murder.

Here's a lovely detail of the spring grasses and the water.

I wonder if Sandy noticed he had captured what looks like a girl in the upstairs window!

We’re back!

Posted by Dawn-Ann on June 7, 2010

I’m sure a lot of folks didn’t even notice we were gone.

I had a few technical problems but I was able to restore most of the blog, except for the last post, which was kind of a silly little thing about bumper stickers. I don’t think I’ll bother reposting that one.

You’ll probably notice my post images are gone and the comments seem to be missing, too. I’ll see what I can do to restore those. Thanks for your patience!

Wallace’s House

Posted by Dawn-Ann on May 30, 2010

Going through all the family history material I have amassed over the years, I find treasure now and then. This has to do with Wallace’s House, which is, I believe, sometimes confused as “Watties Neach” in Kirkpatrick history.

In an 1869 publication called The Bruce and Wallace, I found this little bit of history that even names a Kirkpatrick (quoting an ancient poem called Wallace or The Life and Acts of Sir William Wallace of Ellerslie by Henry the Minstrel):

In the Knok wood he lewyt all bot thre. – V. 735.

In the parish of Kirkmichael, county of Dumfries, there is “a small fort in the Knock Wood, called Wallace’s House, said to have been thrown up by Sir William Wallace, after he had slain Sir Hugh of Moreland and five of his men, at a place still named, from that event, the sax corses, i.e. the six corpses.” Stat. Acc. I. 63. It has been ingeniously remarked, that “the sax corses more probably signify six crosses, in allusion to some religious monument so decorated.” Kerr’s Hist. Bruce, I. 125.

Ane Kyrk Patryk, that cruell was and keyne,
In Esdaill wood that half yer he had beyne.
With Ingliss men he couth nocht weyll accord. – V. 920

This, it appears, was the ancestor of the Kirkpatricks of Closeburne, who appear on record so early as the year 1141. Alexander II. grants a confirmation charter of Closeburne to one of this name, A. 1332, which is still in the possession of the family.

Interesting! This is the same Wallace’s House that I searched for near Garvald. Apparently, it is only a pile of rubble now. I was not successful in finding it – maybe next time.

There is more mention of “Kyrk Patryk” in this lengthy poem, in which he seems to be fighting with Wallace and they seem to be “kyn” (kin). However, I only have a bit of it printed out so I’ll have to do some more study of it when I get a few minutes.

Read more about my Wallace’s House debate here.